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Expanding on the Expander

Often the first step of orthodontic treatment is an expander. Expanders, or palatal expanders, are orthodontic appliances that increase the space between the halves of the upper jaw. While that sounds scary and painful, expanders are very common! Many young and growing orthodontic patients have expanders, and they can help make sure you don’t have to undergo surgery later!

 

Why Would You Need an Expander?

Sometimes in early orthodontic treatment, there are things an orthodontist can see that a parent can’t. An expert orthodontist can “look into the future” and predict common bite issues when your child first comes in for a visit. Expanders for teeth that show a risk of developing bite problems are common first steps of treatment. Because of this, devices like expanders can be used to mitigate those issues and make sure they never occur at all. Expanders create space for new teeth or space for teeth to move into as braces do their job. Expanders prepare the mouth for braces or other treatments. 

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Eating with Braces

One of our most common questions from patients is “What can I eat with my braces?” or “What foods do I have to give up?” and we have a few simple guidelines to share. Getting braces is a big change, and on top of the wires, brackets, or Invisalign trays, there’s a whole new set of habits you must get used to. Luckily, we’re here to help and answer any questions you may have during treatment! If you keep these in mind, your smile and diet will be happy and healthy!

 

Which Foods are Best for Braces?

We know that’s a lot – but here are some soft foods for braces. 

  • Oatmeal
  • Scrambled Eggs
  • Yogurt
  • Fruit Smoothies
  • Soft Fruits (Bite-Size!)
  • Guacamole
  • Hummus
  • Tofu
  • Noodles
  • Soft Bread
  • Soft Cheeses
  • Applesauce
  • Grits
  • Couscous
  • Rice
  • Pancakes

To help with pain after an appointment stick to the soft and cold foods, they aren’t hard on the teeth and the cold is numbing. When soreness subsides, you can return to the normal diet, avoiding problem food groups.

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Starting Your Orthodontic Journey

Parents are usually well-versed in getting their child to the dentist early on. Establishing oral health routines for your toddlers is standard – but many parents have questions about getting their child set up with orthodontic treatment. What about their first visit to the orthodontist? When should they go? Is my child too young for the orthodontist? Is my child too young for braces? Luckily, all these questions have simple answers. 

 

The Lucky Number Seven

Age seven is the magic number for a first orthodontist visit. This is because, at seven, your child’s first set of molars should have come in. This first set of molars erupts between ages six and seven and are in the lower jaw and do not replace any baby teeth. 

The seven-year molars are a good indicator of future dental issues once they have fully grown in. Seeing your child right after this growth occurs allows your orthodontist to get a more accurate picture of your child’s mouth and treatment plan than if they were seen before the molars grew in but give them enough time to address possible issues before it’s too late.

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Gum Disease

What is gum disease? 

Our mouths are full of bacteria. These bacteria help to form plaque on our teeth. Brushing and flossing help to get rid of plaque. The plaque that is not removed by these practices hardens and forms “tartar” that brushing doesn’t clean. This tartar can only be removed by a dentist or dental hygienist. 

Also known as periodontal disease, gum disease is an infection of the tissues that hold your teeth in place. The culprit for this disease is usually poor brushing and flossing habits. These poor habits allow plaque – a sticky film of bacteria – to build up on the teeth and harden. If the disease worsens, it can lead to sore, bleeding gums, painful chewing problems, and even tooth loss.

There are risk factors for gum disease, but smoking is the most significant. Other risk factors include hormonal changes in women, diabetes, and medications that lessen the flow of saliva.

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Dating with Braces

Having to live, eat, and brush around braces is certainly a big task. Many teens and adults who have braces worry about braving the dating scene. Braces can make dating seem daunting and heightens nerves all around. Never fear! There’s no reason your orthodontic treatment should hamper your romantic life. Whether you’re a teen or an adult, dating with braces is possible and still just as fun. Here are a few of our tips and suggestions for a painless date night!

 

 Can You Kiss with Braces?

Yes! We know that kissing with braces seems daunting. We’re asked about how to go about kissing with braces, or if people get stuck together when kissing with braces. So, here are a few facts about kissing to reassure you. Kissing has its benefits! Saliva production increases when kissing, making it great for your teeth and oral health. Contrary to belief, exposure to your partner’s germs can also improve your immune system. A passionate kiss can help you to burn a few extra calories when your heart rate increases.

While it’s true that your mouth is full of bacteria, and that especially during cold and flu season it’s easy to exchange germs, a good oral health regimen can keep disease at bay. 

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Do Braces Cause Canker Sores?

Canker sores are flat white sores that appear in your mouth and can last for a week or more. What causes these small mouth ulcers is unknown. Canker sores aren’t a serious issue, but they aren’t the most comfortable.  However, they are quite easy to prevent, especially once you understand what triggers them.

In This Post, We’ll Cover

  • Do Braces Cause Canker Sores?
  • What Causes Canker Sores?
  • Preventing Canker Sores
  • How to Get Rid of Canker Sores

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